Life Part Two

The adventures of Fay and Bob as they move beyond the 9 to 5 life

Life in 1915

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EITHER YOUR PARENTS OR GRANDPARENTS WERE LIVING DURING THIS TIME PERIOD.

The year is 1915 “Now only One hundred years ago”. What a difference a century makes!

  • In 1915, many practicing doctors in the US had been educated haphazardly since, according to the National Library of Medicine, “medical schools had become mostly diploma mills.” That slowly began to change when the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, considered the first modern medical school, opened in 1893.
  • In 1915, a dozen eggs cost 34 cents; a gallon of milk cost 18 cents; and a pound of coffee cost 30 cents.
  • In 1910, agriculture was the most common industry Americans worked in. (By 1920, it had been surpassed by manufacturing; today, it’s service jobs.)
  • In 1915, the three leading causes of death in the US were heart disease, pneumonia/influenza, and tuberculosis.
  • In 1915, canned beer, modern supermarkets, and Barbie dolls had not yet been invented.
  • In 1915, the US did not have an official national anthem.
  • In 1910, 7.7% of Americans said that they couldn’t read or write, a sharp decline from 1870, when 20% said they were illiterate. (True rates of illiteracy may have been higher, since these were self-reported.)
  • In 1900, only about half of American children between five and 19-years-old were enrolled in school. Ending formal education after eighth grade was typical.

Author: Fay

Follow the adventures of Fay and Bob, 65 plus, as they explore the country to look for a new home, sell their MN home, finally move and get settled into a new state and town.

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